Thursday, September 29, 2016

My Art "anagrammatt/anagrammatter": "...solar eclipse...! - 29sep2016.





 

  My Art "anagrammatt/anagrammatter": "...solar eclipse...! - 29sep2016. 



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"William" SHAKESPEARE: "...The king's a beggar, now the play is done: All is well ended, if this suit be won, That you express content; which we will pay, With strife to please you, day exceeding day: Ours be your patience then, and yours our parts; Your gentle hands lend us, and take our hearts..."






All's Well That Ends Well

Shakespeare homepage | All's Well That Ends Well


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/allswell/allswell.5.3.html



FIRST Scene:

All's Well That Ends Well
Shakespeare homepage | All's Well That Ends Well | Act 1, Scene 1
Next scene

"SCENE I. Rousillon. The COUNT's palace.

    Enter BERTRAM, the COUNTESS of Rousillon, HELENA, and LAFEU, all in black

COUNTESS

    In delivering my son from me, I bury a second husband.

BERTRAM

    And I in going, madam, weep o'er my father's death
    anew: but I must attend his majesty's command, to
    whom I am now in ward, evermore in subjection.

LAFEU

    You shall find of the king a husband, madam; you,
    sir, a father: he that so generally is at all times
    good must of necessity hold his virtue to you; whose
    worthiness would stir it up where it wanted rather
    than lack it where there is such abundance.

COUNTESS

    What hope is there of his majesty's amendment?

LAFEU

    He hath abandoned his physicians, madam; under whose
    practises he hath persecuted time with hope, and
    finds no other advantage in the process but only the
    losing of hope by time.

COUNTESS

    This young gentlewoman had a father,--O, that
    'had'! how sad a passage 'tis!--whose skill was
    almost as great as his honesty; had it stretched so
    far, would have made nature immortal, and death
    should have play for lack of work. Would, for the
    king's sake, he were living! I think it would be
    the death of the king's disease.

LAFEU

    How called you the man you speak of, madam?

COUNTESS

    He was famous, sir, in his profession, and it was
    his great right to be so: Gerard de Narbon.

LAFEU

    He was excellent indeed, madam: the king very
    lately spoke of him admiringly and mourningly: he
    was skilful enough to have lived still, if knowledge
    could be set up against mortality.

BERTRAM

    What is it, my good lord, the king languishes of?

LAFEU

    A fistula, my lord.

BERTRAM

    I heard not of it before.

LAFEU

    I would it were not notorious. Was this gentlewoman
    the daughter of Gerard de Narbon?

COUNTESS

    His sole child, my lord, and bequeathed to my
    overlooking. I have those hopes of her good that
    her education promises; her dispositions she
    inherits, which makes fair gifts fairer; for where
    an unclean mind carries virtuous qualities, there
    commendations go with pity; they are virtues and
    traitors too; in her they are the better for their
    simpleness; she derives her honesty and achieves her goodness.

LAFEU

    Your commendations, madam, get from her tears.

COUNTESS

    'Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise
    in. The remembrance of her father never approaches
    her heart but the tyranny of her sorrows takes all
    livelihood from her cheek. No more of this, Helena;
    go to, no more; lest it be rather thought you affect
    a sorrow than have it.

HELENA

    I do affect a sorrow indeed, but I have it too.

LAFEU

    Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead,
    excessive grief the enemy to the living.

COUNTESS

    If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess
    makes it soon mortal.

BERTRAM

    Madam, I desire your holy wishes.

LAFEU

    How understand we that?

COUNTESS

    Be thou blest, Bertram, and succeed thy father
    In manners, as in shape! thy blood and virtue
    Contend for empire in thee, and thy goodness
    Share with thy birthright! Love all, trust a few,
    Do wrong to none: be able for thine enemy
    Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend
    Under thy own life's key: be cheque'd for silence,
    But never tax'd for speech. What heaven more will,
    That thee may furnish and my prayers pluck down,
    Fall on thy head! Farewell, my lord;
    'Tis an unseason'd courtier; good my lord,
    Advise him.

LAFEU

    He cannot want the best
    That shall attend his love.

COUNTESS

    Heaven bless him! Farewell, Bertram.

    Exit

BERTRAM

    [To HELENA] The best wishes that can be forged in
    your thoughts be servants to you! Be comfortable
    to my mother, your mistress, and make much of her.

LAFEU

    Farewell, pretty lady: you must hold the credit of
    your father.

    Exeunt BERTRAM and LAFEU

HELENA

    O, were that all! I think not on my father;
    And these great tears grace his remembrance more
    Than those I shed for him. What was he like?
    I have forgot him: my imagination
    Carries no favour in't but Bertram's.
    I am undone: there is no living, none,
    If Bertram be away. 'Twere all one
    That I should love a bright particular star
    And think to wed it, he is so above me:
    In his bright radiance and collateral light
    Must I be comforted, not in his sphere.
    The ambition in my love thus plagues itself:
    The hind that would be mated by the lion
    Must die for love. 'Twas pretty, though plague,
    To see him every hour; to sit and draw
    His arched brows, his hawking eye, his curls,
    In our heart's table; heart too capable
    Of every line and trick of his sweet favour:
    But now he's gone, and my idolatrous fancy
    Must sanctify his reliques. Who comes here?

    Enter PAROLLES

    Aside
    One that goes with him: I love him for his sake;
    And yet I know him a notorious liar,
    Think him a great way fool, solely a coward;
    Yet these fixed evils sit so fit in him,
    That they take place, when virtue's steely bones
    Look bleak i' the cold wind: withal, full oft we see
    Cold wisdom waiting on superfluous folly.

PAROLLES

    Save you, fair queen!

HELENA

    And you, monarch!

PAROLLES

    No.

HELENA

    And no.

PAROLLES

    Are you meditating on virginity?

HELENA

    Ay. You have some stain of soldier in you: let me
    ask you a question. Man is enemy to virginity; how
    may we barricado it against him?

PAROLLES

    Keep him out.

HELENA

    But he assails; and our virginity, though valiant,
    in the defence yet is weak: unfold to us some
    warlike resistance.

PAROLLES

    There is none: man, sitting down before you, will
    undermine you and blow you up.

HELENA

    Bless our poor virginity from underminers and
    blowers up! Is there no military policy, how
    virgins might blow up men?

PAROLLES

    Virginity being blown down, man will quicklier be
    blown up: marry, in blowing him down again, with
    the breach yourselves made, you lose your city. It
    is not politic in the commonwealth of nature to
    preserve virginity. Loss of virginity is rational
    increase and there was never virgin got till
    virginity was first lost. That you were made of is
    metal to make virgins. Virginity by being once lost
    may be ten times found; by being ever kept, it is
    ever lost: 'tis too cold a companion; away with 't!

HELENA

    I will stand for 't a little, though therefore I die a virgin.

PAROLLES

    There's little can be said in 't; 'tis against the
    rule of nature. To speak on the part of virginity,
    is to accuse your mothers; which is most infallible
    disobedience. He that hangs himself is a virgin:
    virginity murders itself and should be buried in
    highways out of all sanctified limit, as a desperate
    offendress against nature. Virginity breeds mites,
    much like a cheese; consumes itself to the very
    paring, and so dies with feeding his own stomach.
    Besides, virginity is peevish, proud, idle, made of
    self-love, which is the most inhibited sin in the
    canon. Keep it not; you cannot choose but loose
    by't: out with 't! within ten year it will make
    itself ten, which is a goodly increase; and the
    principal itself not much the worse: away with 't!

HELENA

    How might one do, sir, to lose it to her own liking?

PAROLLES

    Let me see: marry, ill, to like him that ne'er it
    likes. 'Tis a commodity will lose the gloss with
    lying; the longer kept, the less worth: off with 't
    while 'tis vendible; answer the time of request.
    Virginity, like an old courtier, wears her cap out
    of fashion: richly suited, but unsuitable: just
    like the brooch and the tooth-pick, which wear not
    now. Your date is better in your pie and your
    porridge than in your cheek; and your virginity,
    your old virginity, is like one of our French
    withered pears, it looks ill, it eats drily; marry,
    'tis a withered pear; it was formerly better;
    marry, yet 'tis a withered pear: will you anything with it?

HELENA

    Not my virginity yet [ ]
    There shall your master have a thousand loves,
    A mother and a mistress and a friend,
    A phoenix, captain and an enemy,
    A guide, a goddess, and a sovereign,
    A counsellor, a traitress, and a dear;
    His humble ambition, proud humility,
    His jarring concord, and his discord dulcet,
    His faith, his sweet disaster; with a world
    Of pretty, fond, adoptious christendoms,
    That blinking Cupid gossips. Now shall he--
    I know not what he shall. God send him well!
    The court's a learning place, and he is one--

PAROLLES

    What one, i' faith?

HELENA

    That I wish well. 'Tis pity--

PAROLLES

    What's pity?

HELENA

    That wishing well had not a body in't,
    Which might be felt; that we, the poorer born,
    Whose baser stars do shut us up in wishes,
    Might with effects of them follow our friends,
    And show what we alone must think, which never
    Return us thanks.

    Enter Page

Page

    Monsieur Parolles, my lord calls for you.

    Exit

PAROLLES

    Little Helen, farewell; if I can remember thee, I
    will think of thee at court.

HELENA

    Monsieur Parolles, you were born under a charitable star.

PAROLLES

    Under Mars, I.

HELENA

    I especially think, under Mars.

PAROLLES

    Why under Mars?

HELENA

    The wars have so kept you under that you must needs
    be born under Mars.

PAROLLES

    When he was predominant.

HELENA

    When he was retrograde, I think, rather.

PAROLLES

    Why think you so?

HELENA

    You go so much backward when you fight.

PAROLLES

    That's for advantage.

HELENA

    So is running away, when fear proposes the safety;
    but the composition that your valour and fear makes
    in you is a virtue of a good wing, and I like the wear well.

PAROLLES

    I am so full of businesses, I cannot answer thee
    acutely. I will return perfect courtier; in the
    which, my instruction shall serve to naturalize
    thee, so thou wilt be capable of a courtier's
    counsel and understand what advice shall thrust upon
    thee; else thou diest in thine unthankfulness, and
    thine ignorance makes thee away: farewell. When
    thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast
    none, remember thy friends; get thee a good husband,
    and use him as he uses thee; so, farewell.

    Exit

HELENA

    Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
    Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky
    Gives us free scope, only doth backward pull
    Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull.
    What power is it which mounts my love so high,
    That makes me see, and cannot feed mine eye?
    The mightiest space in fortune nature brings
    To join like likes and kiss like native things.
    Impossible be strange attempts to those
    That weigh their pains in sense and do suppose
    What hath been cannot be: who ever strove
    So show her merit, that did miss her love?
    The king's disease--my project may deceive me,
    But my intents are fix'd and will not leave me."

-------------------------


LAST Scene:

All's Well That Ends Well
Shakespeare homepage | All's Well That Ends Well | Act 5, Scene 3
Previous scene

"SCENE III. Rousillon. The COUNT's palace.

    Flourish. Enter KING, COUNTESS, LAFEU, the two French Lords, with Attendants

KING

    We lost a jewel of her; and our esteem
    Was made much poorer by it: but your son,
    As mad in folly, lack'd the sense to know
    Her estimation home.

COUNTESS

    'Tis past, my liege;
    And I beseech your majesty to make it
    Natural rebellion, done i' the blaze of youth;
    When oil and fire, too strong for reason's force,
    O'erbears it and burns on.

KING

    My honour'd lady,
    I have forgiven and forgotten all;
    Though my revenges were high bent upon him,
    And watch'd the time to shoot.

LAFEU

    This I must say,
    But first I beg my pardon, the young lord
    Did to his majesty, his mother and his lady
    Offence of mighty note; but to himself
    The greatest wrong of all. He lost a wife
    Whose beauty did astonish the survey
    Of richest eyes, whose words all ears took captive,
    Whose dear perfection hearts that scorn'd to serve
    Humbly call'd mistress.

KING

    Praising what is lost
    Makes the remembrance dear. Well, call him hither;
    We are reconciled, and the first view shall kill
    All repetition: let him not ask our pardon;
    The nature of his great offence is dead,
    And deeper than oblivion we do bury
    The incensing relics of it: let him approach,
    A stranger, no offender; and inform him
    So 'tis our will he should.

Gentleman

    I shall, my liege.

    Exit

KING

    What says he to your daughter? have you spoke?

LAFEU

    All that he is hath reference to your highness.

KING

    Then shall we have a match. I have letters sent me
    That set him high in fame.

    Enter BERTRAM

LAFEU

    He looks well on't.

KING

    I am not a day of season,
    For thou mayst see a sunshine and a hail
    In me at once: but to the brightest beams
    Distracted clouds give way; so stand thou forth;
    The time is fair again.

BERTRAM

    My high-repented blames,
    Dear sovereign, pardon to me.

KING

    All is whole;
    Not one word more of the consumed time.
    Let's take the instant by the forward top;
    For we are old, and on our quick'st decrees
    The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time
    Steals ere we can effect them. You remember
    The daughter of this lord?

BERTRAM

    Admiringly, my liege, at first
    I stuck my choice upon her, ere my heart
    Durst make too bold a herald of my tongue
    Where the impression of mine eye infixing,
    Contempt his scornful perspective did lend me,
    Which warp'd the line of every other favour;
    Scorn'd a fair colour, or express'd it stolen;
    Extended or contracted all proportions
    To a most hideous object: thence it came
    That she whom all men praised and whom myself,
    Since I have lost, have loved, was in mine eye
    The dust that did offend it.

KING

    Well excused:
    That thou didst love her, strikes some scores away
    From the great compt: but love that comes too late,
    Like a remorseful pardon slowly carried,
    To the great sender turns a sour offence,
    Crying, 'That's good that's gone.' Our rash faults
    Make trivial price of serious things we have,
    Not knowing them until we know their grave:
    Oft our displeasures, to ourselves unjust,
    Destroy our friends and after weep their dust
    Our own love waking cries to see what's done,
    While shame full late sleeps out the afternoon.
    Be this sweet Helen's knell, and now forget her.
    Send forth your amorous token for fair Maudlin:
    The main consents are had; and here we'll stay
    To see our widower's second marriage-day.

COUNTESS

    Which better than the first, O dear heaven, bless!
    Or, ere they meet, in me, O nature, cesse!

LAFEU

    Come on, my son, in whom my house's name
    Must be digested, give a favour from you
    To sparkle in the spirits of my daughter,
    That she may quickly come.

    BERTRAM gives a ring
    By my old beard,
    And every hair that's on't, Helen, that's dead,
    Was a sweet creature: such a ring as this,
    The last that e'er I took her at court,
    I saw upon her finger.

BERTRAM

    Hers it was not.

KING

    Now, pray you, let me see it; for mine eye,
    While I was speaking, oft was fasten'd to't.
    This ring was mine; and, when I gave it Helen,
    I bade her, if her fortunes ever stood
    Necessitied to help, that by this token
    I would relieve her. Had you that craft, to reave
    her
    Of what should stead her most?

BERTRAM

    My gracious sovereign,
    Howe'er it pleases you to take it so,
    The ring was never hers.

COUNTESS

    Son, on my life,
    I have seen her wear it; and she reckon'd it
    At her life's rate.

LAFEU

    I am sure I saw her wear it.

BERTRAM

    You are deceived, my lord; she never saw it:
    In Florence was it from a casement thrown me,
    Wrapp'd in a paper, which contain'd the name
    Of her that threw it: noble she was, and thought
    I stood engaged: but when I had subscribed
    To mine own fortune and inform'd her fully
    I could not answer in that course of honour
    As she had made the overture, she ceased
    In heavy satisfaction and would never
    Receive the ring again.

KING

    Plutus himself,
    That knows the tinct and multiplying medicine,
    Hath not in nature's mystery more science
    Than I have in this ring: 'twas mine, 'twas Helen's,
    Whoever gave it you. Then, if you know
    That you are well acquainted with yourself,
    Confess 'twas hers, and by what rough enforcement
    You got it from her: she call'd the saints to surety
    That she would never put it from her finger,
    Unless she gave it to yourself in bed,
    Where you have never come, or sent it us
    Upon her great disaster.

BERTRAM

    She never saw it.

KING

    Thou speak'st it falsely, as I love mine honour;
    And makest conjectural fears to come into me
    Which I would fain shut out. If it should prove
    That thou art so inhuman,--'twill not prove so;--
    And yet I know not: thou didst hate her deadly,
    And she is dead; which nothing, but to close
    Her eyes myself, could win me to believe,
    More than to see this ring. Take him away.

    Guards seize BERTRAM
    My fore-past proofs, howe'er the matter fall,
    Shall tax my fears of little vanity,
    Having vainly fear'd too little. Away with him!
    We'll sift this matter further.

BERTRAM

    If you shall prove
    This ring was ever hers, you shall as easy
    Prove that I husbanded her bed in Florence,
    Where yet she never was.

    Exit, guarded

KING

    I am wrapp'd in dismal thinkings.

    Enter a Gentleman

Gentleman

    Gracious sovereign,
    Whether I have been to blame or no, I know not:
    Here's a petition from a Florentine,
    Who hath for four or five removes come short
    To tender it herself. I undertook it,
    Vanquish'd thereto by the fair grace and speech
    Of the poor suppliant, who by this I know
    Is here attending: her business looks in her
    With an importing visage; and she told me,
    In a sweet verbal brief, it did concern
    Your highness with herself.

KING

    [Reads] Upon his many protestations to marry me
    when his wife was dead, I blush to say it, he won
    me. Now is the Count Rousillon a widower: his vows
    are forfeited to me, and my honour's paid to him. He
    stole from Florence, taking no leave, and I follow
    him to his country for justice: grant it me, O
    king! in you it best lies; otherwise a seducer
    flourishes, and a poor maid is undone.
    DIANA CAPILET.

LAFEU

    I will buy me a son-in-law in a fair, and toll for
    this: I'll none of him.

KING

    The heavens have thought well on thee Lafeu,
    To bring forth this discovery. Seek these suitors:
    Go speedily and bring again the count.
    I am afeard the life of Helen, lady,
    Was foully snatch'd.

COUNTESS

    Now, justice on the doers!

    Re-enter BERTRAM, guarded

KING

    I wonder, sir, sith wives are monsters to you,
    And that you fly them as you swear them lordship,
    Yet you desire to marry.

    Enter Widow and DIANA
    What woman's that?

DIANA

    I am, my lord, a wretched Florentine,
    Derived from the ancient Capilet:
    My suit, as I do understand, you know,
    And therefore know how far I may be pitied.

Widow

    I am her mother, sir, whose age and honour
    Both suffer under this complaint we bring,
    And both shall cease, without your remedy.

KING

    Come hither, count; do you know these women?

BERTRAM

    My lord, I neither can nor will deny
    But that I know them: do they charge me further?

DIANA

    Why do you look so strange upon your wife?

BERTRAM

    She's none of mine, my lord.

DIANA

    If you shall marry,
    You give away this hand, and that is mine;
    You give away heaven's vows, and those are mine;
    You give away myself, which is known mine;
    For I by vow am so embodied yours,
    That she which marries you must marry me,
    Either both or none.

LAFEU

    Your reputation comes too short for my daughter; you
    are no husband for her.

BERTRAM

    My lord, this is a fond and desperate creature,
    Whom sometime I have laugh'd with: let your highness
    Lay a more noble thought upon mine honour
    Than for to think that I would sink it here.

KING

    Sir, for my thoughts, you have them ill to friend
    Till your deeds gain them: fairer prove your honour
    Than in my thought it lies.

DIANA

    Good my lord,
    Ask him upon his oath, if he does think
    He had not my virginity.

KING

    What say'st thou to her?

BERTRAM

    She's impudent, my lord,
    And was a common gamester to the camp.

DIANA

    He does me wrong, my lord; if I were so,
    He might have bought me at a common price:
    Do not believe him. O, behold this ring,
    Whose high respect and rich validity
    Did lack a parallel; yet for all that
    He gave it to a commoner o' the camp,
    If I be one.

COUNTESS

    He blushes, and 'tis it:
    Of six preceding ancestors, that gem,
    Conferr'd by testament to the sequent issue,
    Hath it been owed and worn. This is his wife;
    That ring's a thousand proofs.

KING

    Methought you said
    You saw one here in court could witness it.

DIANA

    I did, my lord, but loath am to produce
    So bad an instrument: his name's Parolles.

LAFEU

    I saw the man to-day, if man he be.

KING

    Find him, and bring him hither.

    Exit an Attendant

BERTRAM

    What of him?
    He's quoted for a most perfidious slave,
    With all the spots o' the world tax'd and debosh'd;
    Whose nature sickens but to speak a truth.
    Am I or that or this for what he'll utter,
    That will speak any thing?

KING

    She hath that ring of yours.

BERTRAM

    I think she has: certain it is I liked her,
    And boarded her i' the wanton way of youth:
    She knew her distance and did angle for me,
    Madding my eagerness with her restraint,
    As all impediments in fancy's course
    Are motives of more fancy; and, in fine,
    Her infinite cunning, with her modern grace,
    Subdued me to her rate: she got the ring;
    And I had that which any inferior might
    At market-price have bought.

DIANA

    I must be patient:
    You, that have turn'd off a first so noble wife,
    May justly diet me. I pray you yet;
    Since you lack virtue, I will lose a husband;
    Send for your ring, I will return it home,
    And give me mine again.

BERTRAM

    I have it not.

KING

    What ring was yours, I pray you?

DIANA

    Sir, much like
    The same upon your finger.

KING

    Know you this ring? this ring was his of late.

DIANA

    And this was it I gave him, being abed.

KING

    The story then goes false, you threw it him
    Out of a casement.

DIANA

    I have spoke the truth.

    Enter PAROLLES

BERTRAM

    My lord, I do confess the ring was hers.

KING

    You boggle shrewdly, every feather stars you.
    Is this the man you speak of?

DIANA

    Ay, my lord.

KING

    Tell me, sirrah, but tell me true, I charge you,
    Not fearing the displeasure of your master,
    Which on your just proceeding I'll keep off,
    By him and by this woman here what know you?

PAROLLES

    So please your majesty, my master hath been an
    honourable gentleman: tricks he hath had in him,
    which gentlemen have.

KING

    Come, come, to the purpose: did he love this woman?

PAROLLES

    Faith, sir, he did love her; but how?

KING

    How, I pray you?

PAROLLES

    He did love her, sir, as a gentleman loves a woman.

KING

    How is that?

PAROLLES

    He loved her, sir, and loved her not.

KING

    As thou art a knave, and no knave. What an
    equivocal companion is this!

PAROLLES

    I am a poor man, and at your majesty's command.

LAFEU

    He's a good drum, my lord, but a naughty orator.

DIANA

    Do you know he promised me marriage?

PAROLLES

    Faith, I know more than I'll speak.

KING

    But wilt thou not speak all thou knowest?

PAROLLES

    Yes, so please your majesty. I did go between them,
    as I said; but more than that, he loved her: for
    indeed he was mad for her, and talked of Satan and
    of Limbo and of Furies and I know not what: yet I
    was in that credit with them at that time that I
    knew of their going to bed, and of other motions,
    as promising her marriage, and things which would
    derive me ill will to speak of; therefore I will not
    speak what I know.

KING

    Thou hast spoken all already, unless thou canst say
    they are married: but thou art too fine in thy
    evidence; therefore stand aside.
    This ring, you say, was yours?

DIANA

    Ay, my good lord.

KING

    Where did you buy it? or who gave it you?

DIANA

    It was not given me, nor I did not buy it.

KING

    Who lent it you?

DIANA

    It was not lent me neither.

KING

    Where did you find it, then?

DIANA

    I found it not.

KING

    If it were yours by none of all these ways,
    How could you give it him?

DIANA

    I never gave it him.

LAFEU

    This woman's an easy glove, my lord; she goes off
    and on at pleasure.

KING

    This ring was mine; I gave it his first wife.

DIANA

    It might be yours or hers, for aught I know.

KING

    Take her away; I do not like her now;
    To prison with her: and away with him.
    Unless thou tell'st me where thou hadst this ring,
    Thou diest within this hour.

DIANA

    I'll never tell you.

KING

    Take her away.

DIANA

    I'll put in bail, my liege.

KING

    I think thee now some common customer.

DIANA

    By Jove, if ever I knew man, 'twas you.

KING

    Wherefore hast thou accused him all this while?

DIANA

    Because he's guilty, and he is not guilty:
    He knows I am no maid, and he'll swear to't;
    I'll swear I am a maid, and he knows not.
    Great king, I am no strumpet, by my life;
    I am either maid, or else this old man's wife.

KING

    She does abuse our ears: to prison with her.

DIANA

    Good mother, fetch my bail. Stay, royal sir:

    Exit Widow
    The jeweller that owes the ring is sent for,
    And he shall surety me. But for this lord,
    Who hath abused me, as he knows himself,
    Though yet he never harm'd me, here I quit him:
    He knows himself my bed he hath defiled;
    And at that time he got his wife with child:
    Dead though she be, she feels her young one kick:
    So there's my riddle: one that's dead is quick:
    And now behold the meaning.

    Re-enter Widow, with HELENA

KING

    Is there no exorcist
    Beguiles the truer office of mine eyes?
    Is't real that I see?

HELENA

    No, my good lord;
    'Tis but the shadow of a wife you see,
    The name and not the thing.

BERTRAM

    Both, both. O, pardon!

HELENA

    O my good lord, when I was like this maid,
    I found you wondrous kind. There is your ring;
    And, look you, here's your letter; this it says:
    'When from my finger you can get this ring
    And are by me with child,' & c. This is done:
    Will you be mine, now you are doubly won?

BERTRAM

    If she, my liege, can make me know this clearly,
    I'll love her dearly, ever, ever dearly.

HELENA

    If it appear not plain and prove untrue,
    Deadly divorce step between me and you!
    O my dear mother, do I see you living?

LAFEU

    Mine eyes smell onions; I shall weep anon:

    To PAROLLES
    Good Tom Drum, lend me a handkercher: so,
    I thank thee: wait on me home, I'll make sport with thee:
    Let thy courtesies alone, they are scurvy ones.

KING

    Let us from point to point this story know,
    To make the even truth in pleasure flow.

    To DIANA
    If thou be'st yet a fresh uncropped flower,
    Choose thou thy husband, and I'll pay thy dower;
    For I can guess that by thy honest aid
    Thou keep'st a wife herself, thyself a maid.
    Of that and all the progress, more or less,
    Resolvedly more leisure shall express:
    All yet seems well; and if it end so meet,
    The bitter past, more welcome is the sweet.

    Flourish
    EPILOGUE

KING

    The king's a beggar, now the play is done:
    All is well ended, if this suit be won,
    That you express content; which we will pay,
    With strife to please you, day exceeding day:
    Ours be your patience then, and yours our parts;
    Your gentle hands lend us, and take our hearts.

    Exeunt"

-----------------------------

 

...Words some times just are not needed and are not even necessary...~!

...Like: in good times and bad times...~!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sobran_las_palabras
http://www.diggiloo.net/?1976es
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJUSVIK3UdU


Sobran las palabras
   
Words are unnecessary
A veces, hasta sobran las palabras     Sometimes, even words are unnecessary
Cuando se trata de hablar sencillamente de amor     When we're simply talking about love
Y prefiero la elocuencia de un silencio     And I prefer the eloquence of a silence
A esa frase desgastada     To a used phrase
Que a nada suena en mi voz     Which means nothing in my heart
    
Ya sé que tú puedes creer     I know that you can think
Que a mí me falta el interés     That I don't have interest
Pero a veces las promesas más fervientes     But sometimes the most fervent promises
Sólo tratan de ocultar que está muriendo el amor     Only try to hide that love is dying
    
Amor, amor, mi amor     Love, love, my love
Tendrías que aceptarme así     You should accept me that way
Si ves que no me gusta conversar     If you see that I don't like to talk
Aprende a interpretar mi ausencia     Learn to interpret my absence
    
Amor, amor, mi amor     Love, love, my love
Es todo cuanto sé decir     That's all I can say
Amar es algo más que hacer reír     Loving is different from laughing
Yo sé que llenaré tu vida de amor     I know that I'll fill your life with love
    
A veces, hasta sobran las palabras     Sometimes, even words are unnecessary
Cuando se trata de hablar sencillamente de amor     When we're simply talking about love
Y el gesto que hasta pasa inadvertido     And the sign that even escapes attention
Puede ser más importante     Can be more important
Que un juramento ante Dios     Than an oath to God
    
Amor, amor, mi amor     Love, love, my love
Tendrías que aceptarme así     You should accept me that way
Si ves que no me gusta conversar     If you see that I don't like to talk
Aprende a interpretar mi ausencia     Learn to interpret my absence
    
Amor, amor, mi amor     Love, love, my love
Tendrías que aceptarme así     You should accept me that way
Es todo cuanto sé decir, amor, amor     That's all I can say, love, love



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